The Hundred – Mock Draft Round One

Today is the announcement of teams and the assignment of England womens players and the Men’s Icon players.

It can be viewed below:

Full details are to be found https://www.thehundred.com/news/1349818/decision-time-which-england-red-ball-player-will-go-where-

This is my initial back-of-a-cigarette-packet mock draft:

Mens Hundred Teams

BIRMINGHAM-BASED TEAM

Chris Woakes

LEEDS-BASED TEAM

Ben Stokes

LONDON — KIA OVAL

Sam Curran

MANCHESTER-BASED TEAM

Jos Buttler

 

NOTTINGHAM-BASED TEAM

No selection – Stuart Broad hasn’t played Twenty20 cricket for over 2 years

 

SOUTHAMPTON-BASED TEAM

Jofra Archer

 

CARDIFF-BASED TEAM

Jonny Bairstow

LONDON — LORD’s

Joe Root

 

Womens Teams Selection

Details: https://www.thehundred.com/news/1335193/how-women-s-player-selection-works

This would be a lot easier to calculate if the ECB actually made the list of England’s women players who are centrally contracted easy to find on their website:

2019-10-03 (1)

And before I could get it all online, they announced the picks anyway!

https://www.thehundred.com/news/1366687/-first-players-named-in-the-hundred-men-s-women-s-teams

Just Michael Vaughan Getting Bowled A Lot.

Well here you go:

Always give the public the montage of Michael Vaughan being bowled that they want.

 

 

Donald Trump is Coming to Town…

You better watch out 

You better not cry
Better not doubt his unfitness for office
I’m telling you why
Donald Trump is coming to town

He’s making a list of enemies
And checking it twice
We’re gonna find out who’s naughty and nice Ok? 👌

 Donald Trump is coming to town

We know he is unstable 
We know he is on the take
We know he can’t tell between bad or good
So be watchful for goodness sake!

O! You better watch out!
 better not cry
Better not pout
I’m telling you why
Donald Trump is coming to town
Donald Trump is coming to town

Brexit Plan

This is of course an utterly stupid, irrelevant and facile article but I just felt the need to get some thoughts down and in one place, rather than just howling into the void and boring everyone as per usual.

The vote on the 23rd was a momentous event and it is one that will always be a reference point for any future historians concerning themselves about the history and politics of the people living on the British Isles. At the very least the decision to leave the EU has the capacity to change the UK, for good or ill, as much as it did when the Republic of Ireland was created in 1922.

I mention Ireland because I was Dublin earlier this year and you cannot help but notice the Easter Rising commemorations around the city center. That Easter Rising set in process a series of events that eventually lead to the creation of the Irish Free State whilst the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. I don’t believe that it is foolish to suggest that there are parallels to be drawn with the creation of the Irish Free State and with the vote of the UK to leave the European Union.

Once Ireland left the UK it did not mean an end to division, rancor and conflict though and it is this lesson that needs to be headed the most I feel. Ireland experienced civil war directly after leaving the UK, which resulted in more people being killed than in the whole independence campaign prior to 1922. One of the causes of the civil war was the battle over the terms by which Ireland would leave the union and become a separate entity. Hardline nationalists were not placated with a settlement agreed with the former union and rebelled against the government, leading to 10 months of civil war that killed thousands, weakened the nascent republic and lead to decades of bitterness and resentment.

It is clear that we must look to the example of Ireland in a bid to understand their mistakes and lead the UK on a path to leaving the EU that does not create the same levels of division. The stakes are incredibly high, higher than many people seem to realise. Leaving the EU will not be a straightforward process, if it was a country probably would have done it already. It is going to take patience and a great deal of effort to achieve a settlement that works for as many people in all parties as possible.

So we come to the real reason I am writing this. Today there was a vote in the House of Commons over a resolution on the status of EU nationals living in the UK. It was division 69 and the Noes won by 43 votes.

This vote angered me because it is counter to everything that the UK should be doing right now with regards to our EU partners. Brexit means Brexit but Brexit doesn’t mean suddenly having a mid-life crisis, leaving your kids so that you can “find yourself” and start up a disco in your house with people coming and going at all hours of the day and night.

Brexit should mean becoming as indispensable a partner to the EU as possible. The UK should be offering to help as many EU countries as possible in such a way that the UK’s popularity rises with both governments and societies as a whole. If the UK goes down the road of being as obnoxious as possible to suit various domestic agendas then you only have to read Duncan Wheldon’s article about Greece last year to realise that there is only going to be one winner in that regard and it won’t necessarily be the UK.

The UK should be offering fast-tracked citizenship for all EU nationals currently resident in the UK. 3 million people right now are worried about their futures and it is callous beyond measure to try and use people who are contributing to the Exchequer as bargaining chips with other EU governments. Furthermore the UK should be actively selling the UK as a place to live to the rest of the EU. Like it or not if a Brexit deal contains limitations on the freedom of movement then there is going to be shortfall in finances available for public services. This will mean more taxes, massive spending cuts, a huge increase in borrowing and probably all three. The UK needs more people now to pay for the public services that people expect to continue to have, so why not prove that Brexit wasn’t about immigration and was about loftier ideals about sovereignty and accountability by saying that the UK is open for business?

The UK needs to show the EU that Brexit will mean gaining a friend, not an enemy. Theresa May is this week at a meeting of EU heads of government and she could do far worse than to end her speech to those assembled with the words of Abraham Lincoln:

We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature

 

Infamy v 1.0

Archived version
Up-to-date Specator version
A Day of Infamy

Events have a multiplier effect. And when they come in bunches the effect can be overpowering. This was already a sad and demeaning day, even before we heard the ghastly news a Labour MP, Jo Cox, had been murdered outside her constituency surgery in Yorkshire.

Politics is, figuratively speaking, a contact sport. It is a hard business because it is an important business. It matters and it matters even more when the stakes are so very high. But just as class will out at the highest level in sport, when the stakes are the very greatest and everything seems to be on the line, so character reveals itself in politics too. Even, especially, when it really counts.
A referendum is one of those moments when it counts. There is no do-over, no consoling thought in defeat that, at least, there’s always next season. No, defeat is permanent and for keeps. That’s why a referendum is so much uglier than a general election. The ‘wrong’ people often win an election but their victory is only – and always – temporary. There will be another day, another time. An election is a negotiation; a referendum is a judgement with no court of appeal. So character reveals itself. The poster unveiled by Nigel Farage this morning marked a new low, even for him.

The mask – the pawky, gin o’clock, you know what I mean, mask – didn’t slip because there was no mask at all. BREAKING POINT, it screamed above a queue of dusky-hued refugees waiting to cross a border. The message was not very subtle: Vote Leave, Britain, or be over-run by brown people. Take control. Take back our country. You know what I mean, don’t you: If you want a Turk – or a Syrian – for a neighbour, vote Remain. Simple. Common sense. Innit?

And then this afternoon, a 42 year old member of parliament, who happens – and this may prove to have been more than a coincidence – to have been an MP who lobbied for Britain to do more to assist the desperate people fleeing Syria’s charnel house, was shot and stabbed and murdered.
Events have a multiplier effect.

It’s not Nigel Farage’s fault Jo Cox is dead. It’s not Boris Johnson’s fault either. Nor is it the fault of Michael Gove or Dan Hannan or anyone else campaigning for Britain to leave the European Union. Most of these people (there is a glaring exception), like most of the people who will vote Leave next week, are decent and honourable people making an argument they sincerely (there may be one exception to this, too) believe is in the best interests of the United Kingdom. They are not responsible for Jo Cox’s death. The murderer is the only person responsible for that.

But if – as seems likely – the murderer had what are coyly referred to as ties to the far-right, if, as seems all too grimly probable, he was motivated by a hatred of what he felt Britain had become. If, as several witnesses have claimed, he shouted Britain First as he attacked Jo Cox, then it is reasonable – and necessary – to ask where he came from.

We hope, because doing so offers a shred of comfort even in horrid moments, that he was just a ‘lone wolf’ or a lunatic acting alone. We hope so because hoping that makes it easier to say, once the shock has worn off, that this was a singular event of the sort that cannot be predicted. Sometimes terrible things happen.
Well, so they do. But we know that even lone lunatics don’t live in a bubble. They are influenced by outside events. That’s why, when there is an act of Islamist terrorism, we quite rightly want to know if it was, implicitly or explicitly, encouraged by other actors. We do not believe – at least we should not – in collective guilt or punishment but we do want to know, with reason, whether an individual assassin was inspired by ideology or religion or hate-speech or any of a hundred other possible motivating factors. We do not hold all muslims accountable for the violence carried out in the name of their prophet but nor can we avoid the ugly, unpalatable, truth that, as far as the perpetrator is concerned, he (it is almost always he) is acting in the service of his view of his religion. He has a cause, no matter how warped it may be. And so we ask who influenced him? We ask, how did it come to this?

So, no, Nigel Farage isn’t responsible for Jo Cox’s murder. And nor is the Leave campaign. But they are responsible for the manner in which they have pressed their argument. They weren’t to know something like this was going to happen, of course, and they will be just as shocked and horrified by it as anyone else.
But, still. Look. When you encourage rage you cannot then feign surprise when people become enraged. You cannot turn around and say, ‘Mate, you weren’t supposed to take it so seriously. It’s just a game, just a ploy, a strategy for winning votes.’

When you shout BREAKING POINT over and over again, you don’t get to be surprised when someone breaks. When you present politics as a matter of life and death, as a question of national survival, don’t be surprised if someone takes you at your word. You didn’t make them do it, no, but you didn’t do much to stop it either.
Sometimes rhetoric has consequences. If you spend days, weeks, months, years telling people they are under threat, that their country has been stolen from them, that they have been betrayed and sold down the river, that their birthright has been pilfered, that their problem is they’re too slow to realise any of this is happening, that their problem is they’re not sufficiently mad as hell, then at some point, in some place, something or someone is going to snap. And then something terrible is going to happen.

We can’t control the weather but, in politics, we can control the climate in which the weather happens. That’s on us, all of us, whatever side of any given argument we happen to be. Today, it feels like we’ve done something terrible to that climate.
Sad doesn’t begin to cover it. This is worse, much worse, than just sad. This is a day of infamy, a day in which we should all feel angry and ashamed. Because if you don’t feel a little ashamed – if you don’t feel sick, right now, wherever you are reading this – then something’s gone wrong with you somewhere.

Jo Cox was, by all accounts, a fine parliamentarian and a fine woman. She has been taken from her family and her constituents but her death strips something from all of us as well. I cannot recall ever feeling worse about this country and its politics than is the case right now.

Events have a multiplier effect. So do feelings.

Moeen

Moeen , Moeen, Moeen, Moeen,
I’m begging of you please don’t hit it to third man
Moeen, Moeen, Moeen, Moeen
Please don’t take deliveries outside off just because you can

Your driving is beyond compare
With flowing blacklift beyond compare
And dreamy pulls and of emerald green

Your smile is like a breath of spring
Your voice is soft like summer rain
And James Tredwell cannot compete with you, Jolene

He talks about you in his sleep
There’s nothing I can do to keep
From crying when he calls your name, Jolene

And I can easily understand
How you could easily take my man
But you don’t know what he means to me, Jolene

Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
I’m begging of you please don’t take my man
Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
Please don’t take him just because you can

You could have your choice of men
But I could never love again
He’s the only one for me, Jolene

I had to have this talk with you
My happiness depends on you
And whatever you decide to do, Jolene

Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
I’m begging of you please don’t take my man
Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
Please don’t take him even though you can
Jolene, Joleneng of you please don’t hit to third  my man
Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
Please don’t take him just because you can
Your beauty is beyond compare
With flaming locks of auburn hair
With ivory skin and eyes of emerald green

Your smile is like a breath of spring
Your voice is soft like summer rain
And I cannot compete with you, Jolene

He talks about you in his sleep
There’s nothing I can do to keep
From crying when he calls your name, Jolene

And I can easily understand
How you could easily take my man
But you don’t know what he means to me, Jolene

Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
I’m begging of you please don’t take my man
Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
Please don’t take him just because you can

You could have your choice of men
But I could never love again
He’s the only one for me, Jolene

I had to have this talk with you
My happiness depends on you
And whatever you decide to do, Jolene

Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
I’m begging of you please don’t take my man
Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene
Please don’t take him even though you can
Jolene, Jolene

Too much cricket

I can’t believe it’s not ownership – or the curious tale of HIghland TItles selling

Love and Garbage - some commonplace musings

Any good lawyer will be very aware of the areas they know and of the areas they don’t.  If you were to ask me a question about employment law I’d shrug my shoulders, give you the phone numbers of some firms or colleagues and hope you’d be well served by them. One area I do know fairly well though is Scottish property law and conveyancing. This lies at the heart of what I do. And when people play fast and loose with it I get concerned, particularly when those playing fast and loose with it are charging people money.

The other morning I was on twitter and saw a tweet from a twitter user called Highland Titles:

“Buy land in Scotland & you may style yourself as Lord or Lady of Glencoe! From £29.99.”

NOw this raises immediate suspicions. and so I visited the website which was linked to from…

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